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Showing posts from December, 2016

A Very Vintage Inspiration

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Finally, it's New Year's Eve. It's been quite a bumpy year for me personally but we've made it and can kiss that sucka (2016) goodbye! There are a few highlights for me and they mainly revolve around papercrafting. I've met so many wonderful people, some of whom are now friends, confidants, crafting teamies or all three! You've inspired me continuously and I wanted to take the time to say, thank you. Thank you for being part of my life; I appreciate all that you do.  
And what better way to share our appreciation than to design something for the occasion. I've actually made a third project but I can't share...yet. 
We've gone vintage with an older die from the Tonic Inspirations collection. These are AWESOME! My card was designed with the Circle Layering Dies and the Inspire Sentiment from Tonic. Again, I used the Layering Dies to create a 14.5cm circle card blank. I die cut the sentiment using Centura Pearl Paper and added a few Petaloo flowers and ora…

It's all a bit Tartan today.

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Welcome to my blog post on this sunny late December day from cheery Cornwall! Today I'm sharing some cards designed with the New Edition Tartan Paper Pads from Craftwork Cards. 
CWC previously brought out some handbag card blanks and luckily, I made a stencil of one a few months ago and used it today. The very large flowers came in the kit and I hand cut the large stamen, added some matching Candi and a few gems to complete the card. 


I used A4 white card to make a Double Z Card, adding all the tartan designs from one of the pads for this quirky design. Adding sentiments, bows, flowers and matching Cando from the Goodybag. 
Again, I used the A4 white card in the Goodybag to create this card blank (with a sizzix die this time) and just mat and layered for quite an effective card. 
Also, I've lined the inside of the card with matching papers for a finished look.  My last card is a simple matt and layered 15cm square card using all the elements from the Goodybag including sentiment, C…

Boxing Day Goodybag Extravaganza!

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Happy Boxing Day! 
Having woke up this morning from the excesses of Christmas I decided it was time to get creative today. But before I cover myself in glue and glitter I wanted to share some cards I designed for Craftwork Cards. 
I was privileged to work with the Shoreline Goodybag and it's gorgeous! Everything works together beautifully. 



Shoreline Goodybag contains £25.00 worth of product beautifully co-ordinated together with a wonderful ideas sheet with 5 card ideas for only £10.00 Contains: 36 sheets 8x8" patterned papers - Coastal10 white deep etch embossed frames - 5 each of 2 kinds1 x 10g pack CandiRibbons and bowsFoiled SentimentsFlowers Embossed Die cuts10 sheets A4 white cardstock - 300gsm ready to cut and crease to your favourite card size You can buy it here:  http://www.craftworkcards.co.uk/5006/goodybag-shoreline-free-p-p/

Why not take a look at ALL the Boxing Day Goodybags and sale items which you can see here: 
http://www.craftworkcards.co.uk/finishing-touches/boxing…

The Christmas Card, A History!

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Ho, ho, ho - Merry Christmas! 
Now, we've all made and received countless Christmas cards over the years but have you ever wondered where it all began?
Henry Cole was part of the 'elite' in early Victorian England, and had the misfortune of having too many friends.
By 1843, those friends had become quite a pain in the backside with all their letters A custom in England, the Christmas and New Year’s letter had received a new impetus with the recent expansion of the British postal system and the introduction of the 'Penny Post,' allowing the sender to send a letter or card anywhere in the country by affixing a penny stamp to the correspondence.
And everybody who was anybody sent letters! Cole was quite an enthusiastic supporter of the new postal system, and he enjoyed being the 1840s equivalent of an A List Celebrity, but he was also a very busy man, fretting over what to do when there were stacks of unanswered correspondence. “In Victorian England, it was considered…